European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquite connected to the tip of the International Space Station’s robotic arm during a spacewalk on Wednesday (June 16). During the 7-hour 15-minute spacewalk, Pesquet and his colleague, NASA astronaut Shane Kimbro, installed a new International Space Station RollOut Solar Array (iROSA) on the truss frame mounting bracket. of the spine of the space station.
In this image, Pesquet can be seen waving at the camera after releasing the rolled up 350 kg (750 lb) iROSA solar panel.

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“This is a magical experience and a real fight,” Pesquet tweeted after the spacewalk. “I’m not ready to forget this little trick at the end of the robotic arm while holding a device that is three times as heavy as me.” Then he praised a colleague of NASA astronaut Megan McArthur (Megan McArthur) who underwent surgery during the period, the abilities of the robotic arm were checked. “Fortunately, @Astro_Megan is the robotic arm driving trophy champion.”
Pesquet and Kimbrough are expecting another spacewalk next week to install cables and bolts so the solar array can deploy and begin powering the orbital outpost. Tereza Pultarova
Starliner prepares for a test flight in July
engineers prepare Boeing’s Starliner capsule for the second unmanned test flight.

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(Image source: NASA)
Wednesday June 15, 2021: NASA and Boeing engineers are preparing the Starliner capsule for the second unmanned test flight of the International Space Station in late July. The team at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida began refueling the capsule this week and then transferred it to the vertically integrated facility at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, where it will work with the rocket. matched Launch Alliance Atlas V. Due to software bugs and communication interruptions, the first test flight of the
Starliner in December 2019 was unable to reach the space station. A joint NASABoeing review team then recommended a number of improvements related to testing and simulation, operating procedures, software requirements, and crew module communication system work.

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By Peter

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